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Star-Topped Mince Pies Recipe

Cookstr
Course: Dessert
Total Time: Under 2 Hours
Skill Level: Moderate
Cost: Inexpensive
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Star-Topped Mince Pies

Photo by: Joseph De Leo

This is the way I make my mince pies, and there is no changing me or them: they are small, to be popped straight into the mouth in one go; the pastry is plain, the better to contrast with the rich, fruited filling; and they have not full casings but little stars as lids, which makes them look beautiful and taste flutteringly light.

By all means use good store-bought mincemeat if you want, but I’m hoping you might give my new Cranberry-Studded Mincemeat a go: it tastes both rich and boozy and fresh and fruity at the same time; and it makes for a slightly different mince pie, but in a welcome rather than challenging way.

With mince pies, I must have butter of some sort; I’ll take brandy butter (my mother’s), rum butter or a brown sugar bourbon butter. Mince pies are to be savored—not just as one of the last truly seasonal foods in England, but also as a home-grown culinary triumph, provoking one delighted Frenchman to exclaim in a letter, as quoted proudly by Agnes Jekyll in her Kitchen Essays; “ce que j’adore dance la cuisine anglaise ce sont vos petits mince-pi.”

Yield: Makes 36

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 5 tablespoons vegetable shortening, such as Crisco
  • ½ stick (4 tablespoons) cold butter
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Pinch of salt
  • Approximately 2/3 cup mincemeat (see Notes)
  • Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

Directions

1. Get out your 12-hole mini muffin pans along with a 2 ¼- inch fluted, round cookie cutter and a 1 ¾- inch star cutter.

2. Measure the flour into a shallow bowl or dish and, with a teaspoon, dollop little mounds of vegetable shortening into the bowl, add the butter, diced small, shake to cover it, then put in the freezer for 20 minutes. This is what will make the pastry so flaky and tender.

3. Mix together the orange juice and salt in a separate small bowl, cover and leave in the refrigerator to chill.

4. After the 20 minutes, empty the flour and fat into the bowl of your food processor and blitz until you’ve got a pale pile of cake-like crumbs. Pour the salted juice down the funnel, pulsing until it looks as if the dough is about to cohere; you want to stop just before it does (even if some orange juice is left). If all your juice is used up and you need more liquid, add some iced water.

5. If you prefer to use a freestanding mixer to make the pastry, cut the fats into the flour with the paddle, leaving the bowl in the refrigerator to chill down for the 20-minute flour-and-fat-freezer session. Add liquid as above. I often find the pastry uses more liquid in the mixer than the processor.

6. Turn the mixture out of the processor or mixing bowl onto a pastry board or work surface and, using your hands, combine to a dough. Then form into 3 discs (you’ll need to make these in 3 batches, unless you’ve got enough mini muffin pans to make all 36 pies at once).

7. Wrap each disc in plastic wrap and put in the refrigerator to rest for 20 minutes. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

8. Roll out the discs, one at a time, as thinly as you can without exaggerating; in other words, you want a light pastry case, but one sturdy enough to support the dense mincemeat. This is easy-going dough, so you don’t have to pander to it: just get rolling and patch up as you need.

9. Out of each rolled-out disc cut out circles a little wider than the indentations in the tart tins; I use a fluted cookie cutter for this. Press these circles gently into the molds and dollop in a scant teaspoon of mincemeat.

10. Then cut out your stars with your little star-cutter—re-rolling the pastry as necessary—and place the tops lightly on the mincemeat.

11. Put in the oven and bake for 10-15 minutes: keep an eye on them as they really don’t take long and ovens do vary.

12. Remove from the oven, prying out the little pies straightaway and letting the empty tin cool down before you start putting in the pastry for the next batch. Carry on until they’re all done.

13. Dust over some confectioners’ sugar by pushing it through a tea strainer, and serve the pies with one of the butters.

Notes

MAKE AHEAD TIP:

Make the mince pies up to 1 week ahead and leave to cool. Store in an airtight container layered up between sheets of parchment paper. Pop into a warm oven for 3-4 minutes before serving, dusted with confectioners’ sugar.

FREEZE AHEAD TIP:

Make and pack the pies as above and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight on a cooling rack and reheat as above.

Ed. Note: If you'd like to make Nigella's mincemeat filling, type "nigella cranberry" into the search field.


© 2008, 2009 Nigella Lawson
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

Nutrients per serving (% daily value)

Nutritional information is based on 36 servings and does not include confectioners’ sugar for dusting.

56kcal (3%)
9mg (0%)
6g
0g
3g (5%)
0g
1g (6%)
1g
1g
3mg (1%)
0g
1g
3mg
32mg
14mcg RAE (0%)
1mg (2%)
3mg (0%)
0mg (2%)
FROM THE KITCHEN OF...

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